Crouse Health Online: Wellness is just a click away.
Share Share
  |  Connect with Us: 
large
med
small
Text Size
 

Health News



Exercise Is Key for People With Arthritis: Expert

Exercise Is Key for People With Arthritis: Expert

04/01/11

FRIDAY, April 1 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise is a good way for people with arthritis to control pain and improve physical function, says an expert.

"People who have arthritis are often scared to exercise because they think they will hurt themselves, but the condition will only get worse if people don't get moving," Valerie Walkowiak, medical integration coordinator at the Loyola Center for Fitness in Maywood, Ill., said in a news release.

"The best way to start is to talk to your doctor about exercising and then work with a therapist or personal trainer to establish guidelines. Be proactive, and take it one step at a time," she advised.

Exercise offers a number of benefits for people with arthritis, including: increasing muscle strength and endurance to improve joint stability; preserving and restoring joint motion and flexibility; and boosting aerobic conditioning to improve mental health and decrease the risk of other diseases.

About 50 million adults in the United States have arthritis, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Osteoarthritis is the most prevalent form. It occurs when cartilage deteriorates, leaving nearby joints with no cushion between bones. Many people also suffer from rheumatoid arthritis, which occurs when inflammation in the joint causes it to lose shape and alignment.

The best type of exercise program can depend which form of arthritis a person has, but some workouts benefit all patients.

All arthritis sufferers can benefit from stretching to increase range of motion around an affected joint, Walkowiak said. "The type of stretching one should do depends on which joint is affected."

Arthritis sufferers may also want to try light weights a few times a week to build muscle strength and low-impact aerobic exercise such as walking.

"Start slow, with 10 to 15 minutes of aerobic exercise every other day, to see how it impacts your body," Walkowiak said. "As your body adapts to the new routine, gradually increase duration to 30 to 45 minutes."

Other good exercises can include water aerobics, stationary cycling, gardening, swimming, yoga and Tai-Chi.

More information

The Arthritis Foundation has more about exercise and arthritis.

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Please be aware that this information is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

OF INTEREST:
 

Latest News

Crouse Hospital Appoints Chief Information Officer
more >

MedEx Bedside Prescription Delivery Service

Free service offers convenience, patient education at discharge.
more >

Weight Loss Surgery

Is it right for you? Attend a free information seminar held twice monthly.
more >

Quality at Crouse

See how Crouse Hospital strives to provide the best in patient care.
more >

Cheer Up That Special Someone

Say get well or welcome a new arrival with a gift purchased right at Crouse.

more >

Make an Online Donation Now

Your donation of any amount helps support Crouse services & programs in a meaningful way.
more >

Shop Online Now

Say get well, thinking of you or welcome new baby with a unique gift from the Crouse Gift Shop.

more >