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Health News for 04/04/11

April 04, 2011

Health Tip: If You Have a Bleeding Disorder

A bleeding disorder inhibits the blood's ability to clot. Although this type of disorder can't be cured, it can be treated with medication.
Does Stress Reduction Benefit Cancer Patients' Health?

Reducing cancer patients' stress may benefit their health, a new study finds.
Health Tip: Help Prevent Back Injury

The premise is simple: Maintaining good posture lessens your risk of developing back problems.
Ovarian Cancer Prognosis May Depend on Gene Mutations

Ovarian cancer patients with the BRCA2 gene mutation are more likely to survive than those with the BRCA1 mutation or patients without either mutation, a new study finds.
Study Links Smoking, Breast Cancer in Older Women

There's a significant link between smoking and breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women, but it depends on their body weight, researchers report.
Most Breast Tumors Have Unique Genetic 'Fingerprint,' Study Finds

Researchers who sequenced the entire genomes of tumors from 50 breast cancer patients identified more than 1,700 mutations, most of which were unique to individual patients.
Brains of People with Autism Focus More on Visual Skills

The brains of people with autism concentrate more resources in areas devoted to visual perception, resulting in less activity in areas used to plan and control thoughts and actions, says a new study.
Research Warns of Overuse of Powerful Class of Antibiotics

The use of a powerful class of antibiotics called carbapenems has increased dramatically in the United States over the past five years, a new study shows.
Scientists Spot 5 New Alzheimer's Genes

The identification of five new genes associated with Alzheimer's disease is a major advance that will help improve understanding of what causes the condition, say the scientists who pinpointed the genes.
Add Cancer to Health Risks of Diabetes: Study

Diabetes is already linked to a number of complications, but emerging evidence suggests an increased risk of cancer can be added to that list.
Mummies Show Heart Disease Is an Ancient Problem

The earliest known case of coronary artery disease has been found in the 3,550-year-old mummy of an Egyptian princess. She lived between 1580 and 1550 B.C., and died in her early 40s, say researchers.
HPV Might Be Linked to Lung Cancer

Human papillomavirus (HPV), a common sexually transmitted virus that accounts for most cases of cervical cancer, may also play a role in lung cancer, researchers report.
Monthly Aspirin Use Linked to Lower Pancreatic Cancer Risk

Taking aspirin even once per month, whether low-dose or full strength, appears to be associated with a marked drop in the risk of developing pancreatic cancer, new research reveals.
Breast Milk Cells May Someday Help Predict Cancer

Examining cells from a woman's breast milk may help evaluate future breast health, new research suggests.
Too Many Hours at Work Might Harm the Heart

It may be time to add a long workday to the list of risk factors for heart disease.
Heart Attack Risk Plagues Post-Katrina New Orleans

New Orleans residents still faced a threefold higher risk of heart attack four years after the city was devastated by Hurricane Katrina in 2005, a study finds.
Study Hints at Link Between Antidepressants and Heart Trouble

Men taking antidepressants may be at risk for atherosclerosis, which can increase the risk of a heart attack or stroke, a small, preliminary study suggests.
Cases of 'Flattened Head' Babies on the Rise, Study Finds

Cases of "flattened head" in infants and young children appear to be on the rise, a new study of babies in Texas indicates.
Poverty Linked to Anxiety, Mood Disorders

People with low incomes are more likely to suffer mental illness, a new study suggests.
Evidence Weak to Support Many Medications for Autism: Study

Little evidence supports the use of most medications for treating autism in children, with the exception of the anti-psychotic drugs risperidone and aripiprazole that have shown success in controlling severely disruptive, hyperactive and repetitive behaviors, a new study shows.
Yoga May Also Calm a Dangerous Irregular Heartbeat

In a small preliminary study, the ancient art of yoga appeared to halve the number of episodes of a potentially dangerous irregular heartbeat known as atrial fibrillation.
Blood Test Holds Hope for Spotting Lung Cancer in Nonsmokers

Preliminary research suggests that a blood test could offer evidence that a nonsmoker has lung cancer, potentially giving doctors a new diagnostic tool.
Clamp Device for Leaky Heart Valve Seems Effective

A minimally invasive treatment for mitral regurgitation -- a leaky heart valve condition common among seniors -- appears to be as effective as open-heart surgery, new research suggests.
Minimally Invasive Heart-Valve Procedure Shows Promise: Study

An experimental, minimally invasive procedure to place a new valve in a damaged heart is as good as conventional open-heart surgery, although it comes with a higher risk of stroke, researchers reported Sunday.
Could Pop Music Be Linked to Depression?

A preliminary study of American kids suggests a connection between listening to pop music and suffering from major depressive disorder.
Heavy Beer Drinking, Genetics May Raise Risk of Stomach Cancer

Heavy beer drinkers who carry a gene mutation involved in the metabolism of alcohol may face a higher risk than others of developing stomach cancer, new European research suggests.
Health Highlights: April 4, 2011

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:
Bypass Surgery Best for Some Heart Failure Patients

At first glance, patients suffering from heart failure because of blocked coronary arteries appear to fare as well in terms of overall survival whether they have bypass surgery or rely on medication alone, a new study seems to suggest.
Compulsive Eaters May Have 'Food Addiction,' Study Finds

People who are compulsive eaters show similar activity in the same brain regions as people who are addicted to drugs or alcohol, according to new research.
Nerve Stimulation Device Approved to Restore Bowel Control

Medtronic's InterStim implanted electrical stimulation device has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to help restore bowel control in people with chronic fecal incontinence, the company said in a news release.

 

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