Crouse Health Online: Wellness is just a click away.
Share Share
  |  Connect with Us: 
large
med
small
Text Size
 

Health News



Too Few Teens Know the Dangers of Tanning Beds: Poll

Too Few Teens Know the Dangers of Tanning Beds: Poll

05/10/11

TUESDAY, May 10 (HealthDay News) -- Many tanning salons in the United States don't warn teens and young women about the skin cancer risks posed by tanning beds, according to a new survey.

The American Academy of Dermatology's online poll included more than 3,800 white females aged 14 to 22 from across the country who were asked about their tanning knowledge, attitudes and behavior.

The survey found that 43 percent of indoor tanners said they had never been warned about the dangers of tanning beds by tanning salon employees, and 30 percent said they hadn't noticed any warning labels on tanning beds.

And the survey revealed some potentially deadly misperceptions about tanning beds.

Younger tanning bed users (aged 14 to 17) were twice as likely as older users (aged 18 to 22) to incorrectly believe that tanning beds are safer than the sun (39 percent versus 15 percent), and more than three times as likely to incorrectly believe that tanning beds do not cause skin cancer (26 percent versus 8 percent), according to the results.

"Indoor tanning poses a significant health risk, especially for [white people] because of their fair skin. Studies have found that UV [ultraviolet] radiation from indoor tanning beds increases a person's risk of developing melanoma by 75 percent," Dr. Ronald L. Moy, president of the American Academy of Dermatology Association (AADA), said in an academy news release.

"Contributing to this problem is the fact that tanning bed facilities currently are not required to verbally warn patrons of the known health risks of UV radiation and, in some cases, they may be misleading the public by falsely promoting artificial UV light as safer than natural sunlight," he added.

Moy noted that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration currently classifies tanning beds as a Class I medical device. This means they are subject to a minimal level of regulation and oversight, similar to tongue depressors, bandages and crutches.

"That is why it's important that the FDA change the classification of indoor tanning devices to reflect the significant health risks that they pose, often unknowingly, to tanning salon patrons," Moy added.

The AADA supports the Tanning Bed Cancer Control Act, which calls on the FDA to review its classification of indoor tanning beds and to introduce enhanced consumer warning label rules for the devices.

More information

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has more about tanning beds.

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Please be aware that this information is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

OF INTEREST:
 

Latest News

Crouse Hospital Appoints Chief Information Officer
more >

MedEx Bedside Prescription Delivery Service

Free service offers convenience, patient education at discharge.
more >

CrouseSports Express After-Hours Ortho Care

Immediate care of orthopedic injuries in kids and adults.
more >

Weight Loss Surgery

Is it right for you? Attend a free information seminar held twice monthly.
more >

Quality at Crouse

See how Crouse Hospital strives to provide the best in patient care.
more >

Cheer Up That Special Someone

Say get well or welcome a new arrival with a gift purchased right at Crouse.

more >

Make an Online Donation Now

Your donation of any amount helps support Crouse services & programs in a meaningful way.
more >

Shop Online Now

Say get well, thinking of you or welcome new baby with a unique gift from the Crouse Gift Shop.

more >