Crouse Health Online: Wellness is just a click away.
Share Share
  |  Connect with Us: 
large
med
small
Text Size
 

Health News



At-Home Blood Pressure Monitoring More Telling Than Doctor's Office Readings

At-Home Blood Pressure Monitoring More Telling Than Doctor's Office Readings

06/27/11

MONDAY, June 27 (HealthDay News) -- Blood pressure readings logged over a 24-hour period on a portable home monitoring device appear more effective than blood pressure readings taken in a doctor's office for predicting whether patients with chronic kidney disease will experience kidney failure or death.

That's the finding of an Italian study that included 436 chronic kidney disease patients who were not on dialysis.

In the study, each patient's blood pressure was measured multiple times while at a clinic over the course of two days. They were also given an ambulatory blood pressure monitor that took readings every 15 minutes during the day and every half hour at night over a 24-hour period.

At-home blood pressure monitors are believed to help overcome what's known as "white coat hypertension," in which a patient's blood pressure spikes because of stress and anxiety when visiting a physician's office. According to background information in the article, chronic kidney disease patients are especially vulnerable to this.

Prior research has also suggested that nighttime blood pressure readings may be a better measure of a patient's actual blood pressure status because readings are taken when the patient is at rest and free of the physical and emotional stresses of everyday life that can have an impact on readings.

During an average follow-up of 4.2 years, 86 patients developed kidney failure and 69 died. There were also 63 non-fatal cardiovascular events and 52 deaths caused by cardiovascular problems.

Patients with the highest risk of kidney or cardiovascular problems were those whose daytime systolic (top number) blood pressure was 135 mm Hg or higher; those with high diastolic (bottom number) readings; those with nighttime systolic readings of 124 mm Hg or higher; and those with nighttime diastolic readings of 70 mm Hg or higher. All these readings were provided by the ambulatory device.

"In contrast, office [blood pressure] measurements ... did not predict cardiovascular or renal events," the researchers wrote.

The study appears in the June issue of the journal Archives of Internal Medicine.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about chronic kidney disease.

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Please be aware that this information is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

OF INTEREST:
 

Latest News

Crouse First in Area to Perform Single-Site Hysterectomy
more >

MedEx Bedside Prescription Delivery Service

Free service offers convenience, patient education at discharge.
more >

CrouseSports Express After-Hours Ortho Care

Immediate care of orthopedic injuries in kids and adults.
more >

Weight Loss Surgery

Is it right for you? Attend a free information seminar held twice monthly.
more >

Quality at Crouse

See how Crouse Hospital strives to provide the best in patient care.
more >

Cheer Up That Special Someone

Say get well or welcome a new arrival with a gift purchased right at Crouse.

more >

Make an Online Donation Now

Your donation of any amount helps support Crouse services & programs in a meaningful way.
more >

Shop Online Now

Say get well, thinking of you or welcome new baby with a unique gift from the Crouse Gift Shop.

more >