Crouse Health Online: Wellness is just a click away.
Share Share
  |  Connect with Us: 
large
med
small
Text Size
 

Health News



Melanoma May Be More Aggressive in Kids

Melanoma May Be More Aggressive in Kids

10/07/11

FRIDAY, Oct. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Some children with melanoma are more likely to have invasive disease than adults with this potentially deadly type of skin cancer, a new study indicates.

The findings suggest that there may be biological differences between childhood and adult melanoma, said the researchers at the Johns Hopkins Children's Center in Baltimore.

They analyzed the medical records of 717 children and 1,368 young adults (aged 20 to 24) diagnosed with melanoma and compared sentinel lymph node biopsy results based on tumor size, tumor appearance and patient age. Sentinel lymph nodes are those that surround the tumor, and sentinel lymph node biopsy is the standard way to assess spread (metastasis) of the cancer and determine treatment.

Cancer cells were found in the sentinel lymph nodes of 25 percent of children and 14 percent of adults who had biopsies. Tumor thickness was the strongest predictor of lymph node metastases in both children and adults.

But children with tumors with a thickness of 1.01 and 2 millimeters were nearly six times more likely than young adults with same-thickness tumors to have cancer cells in sentinel lymph nodes.

The researchers also found that children younger than 10 were more likely to have distant metastases (spread of cancer beyond the immediate tumor site) and greater tumor thickness, compared with older children and young adults.

Regardless of age, patients with bleeding tumors or those with open sores were more likely to have metastases.

The study was published online Oct. 5 in the journal Cancer.

"Our finding is a powerful reminder that there's much about pediatric melanoma that we don't understand and that, just as is the case with other diseases, children are not small adults, but differ markedly in their response to disease," senior investigator Dr. John Strouse, a pediatric hematologist and oncologist, said in a Johns Hopkins Medicine news release.

Although still uncommon, melanoma diagnoses in children are increasing, and unprotected sun exposure, sunburns and indoor tanning are some of the known causes.

More information

The American Academy of Family Physicians has more about melanoma.

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Please be aware that this information is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

OF INTEREST:
 

Latest News

Crouse Hospital Auxiliary Presents Take Me to Vegas on Friday, May 2
more >

MedEx Bedside Prescription Delivery Service

Free service offers convenience, patient education at discharge.
more >

CrouseSports Express After-Hours Ortho Care

Immediate care of orthopedic injuries in kids and adults.
more >

Weight Loss Surgery

Is it right for you? Attend a free information seminar held twice monthly.
more >

Quality at Crouse

See how Crouse Hospital strives to provide the best in patient care.
more >

Cheer Up That Special Someone

Say get well or welcome a new arrival with a gift purchased right at Crouse.

more >

Make an Online Donation Now

Your donation of any amount helps support Crouse services & programs in a meaningful way.
more >

Shop Online Now

Say get well, thinking of you or welcome new baby with a unique gift from the Crouse Gift Shop.

more >