Crouse Health Online: Wellness is just a click away.
Share Share
  |  Connect with Us: 
large
med
small
Text Size
 

Health News



Helping Teens Fend Off Attacks by Cyberbullies

Helping Teens Fend Off Attacks by Cyberbullies

10/14/11

FRIDAY, Oct. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Cyberbullies victimize their classmates and acquaintances online because they don't see the immediate consequences of their actions and they mistakenly believe their posts, tweets or emails can't be traced back to them, according to one expert.

"If a girl posts a mean remark online, she doesn't have to witness the target's hurt reaction," explained Brandie Oliver, an assistant professor of school counseling at Butler University in Indianapolis who also supervises a high school peer counseling program. "Many students post messages that they would never say in a face-to-face situation."

Children should be taught to stand up for themselves -- both in real time and in cyberspace, Oliver said. "Kids need to speak up and tell other kids (especially a bully) what they need and what they don't want," she explained in a university news release.

As a rash of U.S. suicides has shined a spotlight on cyberbullying, Oliver outlined some ways to help young people survive digital attacks and also protect themselves from future bullying:

  • Only accept online friends who are known and trusted.
  • Do not participate in online bullying, gossip or the sharing of embarrassing photos and videos -- either yours or someone else's.
  • Understand that any messages, pictures or videos posted online can be seen and commented on by others.

Parents should get involved and help their children understand the online world, Oliver advised. Also, parents must limit Internet access if they believe their teens are not capable of handling the drama that can play out online, she said.

Oliver said her own teenage daughter "tries to tell me everyone has a Facebook account. I know that's not true, and I don't feel that my daughter is ready for this digital step. You have to stand firm and be a parent."

Parents should also direct their kids toward activities that build up their self-confidence to help them fend off potential attacks by bullies. "Kids with self-confidence have a built-in shield against bully behavior," she said.

Oliver added that young people should be encouraged to stand up for other kids who are the victims of bullies and report any harassment or bullying to an adult.

More information

The U.S. National Crime Prevention Council provides more information on cyberbullying.

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Please be aware that this information is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

OF INTEREST:
 

Latest News

Crouse Hospital Appoints Chief Information Officer
more >

MedEx Bedside Prescription Delivery Service

Free service offers convenience, patient education at discharge.
more >

Weight Loss Surgery

Is it right for you? Attend a free information seminar held twice monthly.
more >

Quality at Crouse

See how Crouse Hospital strives to provide the best in patient care.
more >

Cheer Up That Special Someone

Say get well or welcome a new arrival with a gift purchased right at Crouse.

more >

Make an Online Donation Now

Your donation of any amount helps support Crouse services & programs in a meaningful way.
more >

Shop Online Now

Say get well, thinking of you or welcome new baby with a unique gift from the Crouse Gift Shop.

more >