Crouse Health Online: Wellness is just a click away.
Share Share
  |  Connect with Us: 
large
med
small
Text Size
 

Health News



Breast Cancer Risk May Rise With High Hormone Levels

Breast Cancer Risk May Rise With High Hormone Levels

10/21/11

FRIDAY, Oct. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Elevated levels of hormones increase breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women, and as the number of different elevated hormones rises, so does the risk, a new study has found.

Researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston examined levels of eight different sex and growth hormones in blood samples collected from nurses up to nine years before their health information was recorded.

The risk of breast cancer increased 16 percent with each elevated hormone level, according to the study published online Oct. 21 in the journal Breast Cancer Research.

The investigators found that the highest levels of circulating estrogens (estrone and estrogen), prolactin, and androgens (testosterone, androstenedione, DHEA, or DHEA-sulfate) were each associated with between a 50 and 200 percent increased risk of developing breast cancer.

A woman with elevated levels of one hormone had a 10 percent increased risk, while the risk was doubled for those with elevated levels of five or six hormones, and tripled for those with elevated levels of seven or eight hormones, the study authors explained in a journal news release.

And for women with estrogen receptor-positive (ER-positive) breast cancer, all of these risks were slightly higher, the researchers pointed out.

"Elevated estrogens had the biggest effect on risk, especially for ER-positive cancer. However, androgens and prolactin also contribute to increasing risk of breast cancer. These hormones are known to stimulate the growth of breast cancer cells in the lab and, while androgens can be converted to estrogen in the body, these hormones have also been found to stimulate cancer cell growth in the absence of ER," Shelley Tworoger, of Brigham and Women's Hospital, explained in the news release.

"Our results suggest that models used to assess breast cancer risk could be improved by taking into account multiple sex hormone and growth hormone levels," she added.

More information

The American Cancer Society has more about breast cancer.

Copyright © 2011 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Please be aware that this information is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

OF INTEREST:
 

Latest News

Crouse First in Area to Perform Single-Site Hysterectomy
more >

MedEx Bedside Prescription Delivery Service

Free service offers convenience, patient education at discharge.
more >

CrouseSports Express After-Hours Ortho Care

Immediate care of orthopedic injuries in kids and adults.
more >

Weight Loss Surgery

Is it right for you? Attend a free information seminar held twice monthly.
more >

Quality at Crouse

See how Crouse Hospital strives to provide the best in patient care.
more >

Cheer Up That Special Someone

Say get well or welcome a new arrival with a gift purchased right at Crouse.

more >

Make an Online Donation Now

Your donation of any amount helps support Crouse services & programs in a meaningful way.
more >

Shop Online Now

Say get well, thinking of you or welcome new baby with a unique gift from the Crouse Gift Shop.

more >