Crouse Health Online: Wellness is just a click away.
Share Share
  |  Connect with Us: 
large
med
small
Text Size
 

Health News



'Upper Normal' Blood Pressure Linked to Heart Risk in Men

'Upper Normal' Blood Pressure Linked to Heart Risk in Men

01/17/12

TUESDAY, Jan. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Middle-aged men with blood pressure in the upper-normal range are at increased risk for atrial fibrillation later in life, researchers say.

Atrial fibrillation -- which affects more than 2.7 million Americans -- is a heart rhythm disorder that can lead to stroke and other heart-related complications. High blood pressure is a known risk factor for atrial fibrillation.

Previous research has shown that women with blood pressure in the upper end of the normal range are at increased risk for atrial fibrillation. This study looked at whether the same was true in men.

In the new study, Norwegian researchers analyzed data from more than 2,000 men aged 40 to 59 who had their blood pressure measured at the start of the study and were followed for up to 35 years. During the follow-up, 270 (13 percent of the men) developed atrial fibrillation.

U.S. guidelines define high blood pressure as systolic pressure (top number) at 140 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) or higher and diastolic pressure (bottom number) at 90 mm Hg or higher. Pre-hypertension is a systolic pressure of 120 to 139 mm Hg and a diastolic pressure from 80 to 89 mm Hg.

Men with high systolic blood pressure at the start of the study were 60 percent more likely to develop atrial fibrillation during follow-up than those with normal systolic blood pressure.

Men with upper-normal levels of systolic blood pressure (128 to 138 mm Hg) were 50 percent more likely to develop atrial fibrillation than those with normal systolic blood pressure (below 128 mm Hg), the investigators reported.

And, they found, men with a diastolic of 80 mm Hg or higher at the start of the study were 79 percent more likely to develop atrial fibrillation than those with diastolic blood pressure below 80 mm Hg (normal).

On average, according to the report published in the Jan. 17 edition of the journal Hypertension, atrial fibrillation developed 20 years after the start of the study.

"Our results indicate that men with upper-normal blood pressure appear to have a higher risk for [atrial fibrillation] than men with lower blood pressure," lead author Dr. Irene Grundvold, a consultant cardiologist in the cardiology department at Oslo University Hospital, said in journal news release.

More information

The U.S. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute has more about atrial fibrillation.

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Please be aware that this information is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

OF INTEREST:
 

Latest News

Crouse Employee Lois Wille Walks the Simply Well Lifestyle Talk
more >

MedEx Bedside Prescription Delivery Service

Free service offers convenience, patient education at discharge.
more >

CrouseSports Express After-Hours Ortho Care

Immediate care of orthopedic injuries in kids and adults.
more >

Weight Loss Surgery

Is it right for you? Attend a free information seminar held twice monthly.
more >

Quality at Crouse

See how Crouse Hospital strives to provide the best in patient care.
more >

Cheer Up That Special Someone

Say get well or welcome a new arrival with a gift purchased right at Crouse.

more >

Make an Online Donation Now

Your donation of any amount helps support Crouse services & programs in a meaningful way.
more >

Shop Online Now

Say get well, thinking of you or welcome new baby with a unique gift from the Crouse Gift Shop.

more >