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Health News



Health News for 05/01/12

May 01, 2012

Health Tip: Taking the Kids for a Shopping Cart Ride

More than 20,000 children are hurt each year in incidents stemming from shopping carts, the American Academy of Pediatrics says.
Health Tip: Don't Forget Aerobic Exercise

There are plenty of easy ways to work aerobic exercise into your day without visiting the gym.
Many Asthmatic Kids Harmed by Secondhand Smoke: Study

Many asthmatic children in the United States are exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke and suffer health problems because of it, a new study shows.
Exercise Plus Computer Time May Boost Seniors' Brains

A combination of moderate exercise and mental stimulation through computer use may help reduce the risk of age-related memory loss more than computer use or exercise alone, according to new research.
Fish Oil Doesn't Cut Failure Rate of Hemodialysis Grafts

Taking fish-oil supplements does not significantly lower the failure rate of grafts used for hemodialysis, a new study finds.
Arthritis in Children Linked to Infections

Children with juvenile arthritis have higher rates of bacterial infection when hospitalized than children without arthritis, a new study says.
Seniors Undertreated for Asthma, and Many Skip Inhalers: Study

Asthma often is misdiagnosed and undertreated in older people, with only 53 percent of those with asthma using prescribed inhalers, a small new study suggests.
Health Care Disparities Might Affect Black Kids' Cancer Survival

Equal access to health care would reduce the disparity in survival rates between white and black children with cancer, a new study suggests.
Study Downplays Risk of CT Scans

A new study of young people who underwent CT scans suggests that their risk of dying from a condition related to their radiation exposure is far less than dying from the original disease they faced.
Tasers Can Trigger Fatal Heart Trouble, Study Says

Taser guns used by law enforcement can cause heart rhythm problems, sudden cardiac arrest and death, according to a new study.
Less-Invasive Surgery for Esophageal Cancer Might Be Safer

Besides being easier on the patient, minimally invasive surgery to remove the esophagus of patients with esophageal cancer can also greatly reduce the risk of lung infection compared to traditional open surgery, a new study finds.
Better Ways Needed to Track Drug Safety: Report

A management plan to gather, assess and respond to data about all medications' risks from the time they are approved until they are no longer on the market is needed to improve drug safety in the United States, says an Institute of Medicine report released Tuesday.
Women More Likely to Survive Melanoma Than Men: Study

When it comes to surviving the skin cancer known as melanoma, nature appears to have dealt women a better hand than men, new research suggests.
Healthy Weight Loss May Also Cut Your Cancer Risk

Moderate weight loss reduces levels of inflammation that have been tied to certain cancers, at least in postmenopausal women, a new study suggests.
How That Glass of Red Wine Might Help You Live Longer

Researchers have found new evidence showing that resveratrol, a compound found in red wine, may play a role in preventing cell aging.
Health Highlights: May 1, 2012

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:
Can Blood Test Predict Breast Cancer Risk?

A blood test that spots changes in a specific gene could reveal a woman's risk for breast cancer years before the disease has a chance to develop, researchers report.
For Breast Cancer Care, Radiation of Whole Breast May Be Best

Women who receive a type of partial-breast radiation called brachytherapy may go on to have higher rates of breast cancer recurrence and side effects such as breast pain and infection than women receiving whole-breast radiation, a new study indicates.
Analysis Finds Clinical Trials Often Small, of Poor Quality

A new analysis of registered U.S. clinical trials -- the research that seeks to determine if medical treatments and prevention strategies work -- finds that many are small and of poor quality.
Elelyso Approved for Gaucher Disease

Elelyso (taliglucerase alfa) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as a long-term enzyme replacement therapy for people with a rare genetic disorder called type 1 Gaucher disease.

 

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