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Cut Back on Sugar to Lose Some Weight

Cut Back on Sugar to Lose Some Weight

01/16/13

WEDNESDAY, Jan. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Cutting back on sugar intake can help adults lose weight and should be part of the strategy to fight the global obesity epidemic, a new study suggests.

Although sugar intake is just one of the many causes for obesity, researchers in New Zealand found the effects of limiting sugar on body weight are significant. Their findings were published online Jan. 15 in the BMJ.

"Free sugars" are sugars added to foods by manufacturers, consumers and cooks. They are also found in honey, syrup and fruit juices, the study authors explained in a journal news release. The World Health Organization recommends cutting the intake of these free sugars to less than 10 percent of total energy.

After examining a total of 71 studies, including 30 trials where participants were randomly assigned to a sugar intake intervention or no intervention, Jim Mann, of the human nutrition department at the University of Otago, and colleagues in New Zealand found that cutting back on free sugars for up to eight months was associated with an average weight loss of 1.8 pounds. Meanwhile, increasing free sugar intake was linked to a weight gain of 1.7 pounds.

The researchers acknowledged that the findings were limited by the fact that few of the studies they analyzed lasted longer than 10 weeks. They concluded, however, "when considering the rapid weight gain that occurs after an increased intake of sugars, it seems reasonable to conclude that advice relating to sugars intake is a relevant component of a strategy to reduce the high risk of overweight and obesity in most countries."

Although the effects on children were less clear, the study authors noted that children with greater sugar intake were at greater risk for being overweight or obese.

In response to the study's findings, U.S. experts said limiting the intake of drinks sweetened with sugar through taxes on sugary drinks, restrictions on ads directed toward children and limiting serving sizes "is a high priority." In an editorial accompanying the study, Walter Willett, a professor in the department of nutrition at Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, and a colleague pointed to the need for educational programs, improvements in menus at schools and worksites, as well as nutrition programs for people with low incomes.

More information

The American Heart Association has more about sugar and carbohydrates.

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Please be aware that this information is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

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