Crouse Health Online: Wellness is just a click away.
  |  Connect with Us: 
large
med
small
Text Size
 

Health News



Study Confirms Slight Rise in Paralysis Risk After Swine Flu Shot

Study Confirms Slight Rise in Paralysis Risk After Swine Flu Shot

03/13/13

WEDNESDAY, March 13 (HealthDay News) -- People who were vaccinated against the 2009 H1N1 swine flu virus had a slightly increased risk of a paralysis disorder, according to a new study, but the benefits of vaccination greatly outweighed the risks.

Researchers analyzed data from 23 million people in the United States who received the vaccine during the 2009 outbreak -- the largest mass vaccination in recent U.S. history -- and found that they had a small excess risk of developing Guillain-Barre syndrome.

The disorder of the nervous system results in temporary or longer-term paralysis, and sometimes causes death.

The researchers found that 77 people developed Guillain-Barre syndrome up to 91 days after receiving the H1N1 vaccine. They concluded that there were 1.6 excess cases of Guillain-Barre syndrome in every 1 million people vaccinated, according to the study, which was published online March 12 in the journal The Lancet.

About 61 million cases of H1N1 swine flu were reported in the United States during the 2009 pandemic, including about 274,000 hospital admissions and more than 12,000 deaths. H1N1 vaccines offered substantial protection, said study leader Dr. Daniel Salmon, of the National Vaccine Program Office at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Salmon said a recent study estimated that the H1N1 vaccination program prevented between 700,000 and 1.5 million cases of flu, between 4,000 and 10,000 hospital admissions, and as many as 500 deaths. Health care professionals, lawmakers and patients "should be assured that the benefits [of vaccination] greatly outweighed the risks," Salmon concluded in a journal news release.

Guillain-Barre syndrome usually follows a viral or bacterial infection. Although it is a serious condition from which patients typically take months to recover, about 80 percent have a full recovery with appropriate treatment.

More information

The U.S. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke has more about Guillain-Barre syndrome.

Health NewsCopyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Please be aware that this information is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

OF INTEREST:
 

Latest News

Cicero Couple Express Gratitude to Crouse Staff for the Best in Maternity Patient Care
more >

MedEx Bedside Prescription Delivery Service

Free service offers convenience, patient education at discharge.
more >

Weight Loss Surgery

Is it right for you? Attend a free information seminar held twice monthly.
more >

Quality at Crouse

See how Crouse Hospital strives to provide the best in patient care.
more >

Cheer Up That Special Someone

Say get well or welcome a new arrival with a gift purchased right at Crouse.

more >

Make an Online Donation Now

Your donation of any amount helps support Crouse services & programs in a meaningful way.
more >

Shop Online Now

Say get well, thinking of you or welcome new baby with a unique gift from the Crouse Gift Shop.

more >