Crouse Health Online: Wellness is just a click away.
Share Share
  |  Connect with Us: 
large
med
small
Text Size
 

Health News



Play It Smart When It Comes to Lightning

Play It Smart When It Comes to Lightning

03/24/13

SUNDAY, March 24 (HealthDay News) -- Lightning safety is an important issue for people who enjoy outdoor recreational and sports activities, according to the National Athletic Trainer's Association.

During the past decade, lightning caused an average of 42 deaths a year in the United States and about 10 times as many injuries.

In 2010, outdoor recreational activities and organized sports accounted for 62 percent of lightning-related deaths, according to the National Weather Service. In 2011, those activities accounted for 48 percent of lightning-related deaths.

The National Athletic Trainer's Association has released a position statement that outlines ways to reduce the number of injuries and deaths caused by lightning strikes. It appears in the March issue of the Journal of Athletic Training.

"All individuals, particularly those who are in charge of sports and recreational activities, should be aware of the hazards, establish and follow appropriate guidelines, and ensure that those around them do so," statement writing group chairwoman Katie Walsh, of East Carolina University, said in an association news release. "Proper preparation and notifying participants of lightning danger is critical."

Coaches, athletic trainers, parents, administrators and others involved in outdoor athletic or recreational activities are urged to follow these lightning safety policies:

  • Create a lightning-specific emergency plan for each outdoor location.
  • Ensure lightning and general weather awareness.
  • Prepare planning protocols for large venues.
  • Be equipped and prepared to provide first aid.

Anyone involved in an outdoor activity should be aware that safety comes first and that there are no penalties or repercussions if they feel there is a danger of lightning and want to find a safe location, Walsh said.

The threat of thunderstorms and lighting is particularly high from afternoon to early evening between late spring and early fall, which is when 90 percent of casualties occur, according to the news release. July is the most dangerous month.

More information

For more on lightning safety, visit the U.S. National Weather Service.

Health NewsCopyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Please be aware that this information is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

OF INTEREST:
 

Latest News

Crouse First in Area to Perform Single-Site Hysterectomy
more >

MedEx Bedside Prescription Delivery Service

Free service offers convenience, patient education at discharge.
more >

CrouseSports Express After-Hours Ortho Care

Immediate care of orthopedic injuries in kids and adults.
more >

Weight Loss Surgery

Is it right for you? Attend a free information seminar held twice monthly.
more >

Quality at Crouse

See how Crouse Hospital strives to provide the best in patient care.
more >

Cheer Up That Special Someone

Say get well or welcome a new arrival with a gift purchased right at Crouse.

more >

Make an Online Donation Now

Your donation of any amount helps support Crouse services & programs in a meaningful way.
more >

Shop Online Now

Say get well, thinking of you or welcome new baby with a unique gift from the Crouse Gift Shop.

more >