Crouse Health Online: Wellness is just a click away.
Share Share
  |  Connect with Us: 
large
med
small
Text Size
 

Health News



Paranoia Common After Mugging, Study Says

Paranoia Common After Mugging, Study Says

03/27/13

WEDNESDAY, March 27 (HealthDay News) -- People who have been mugged or randomly attacked can remain highly distrustful of others long after the incident, a new study finds.

The findings reveal a previously under-recognized effect of physical assault and could help improve therapy for victims, the British researchers said.

Their study included more than 100 people treated at a hospital for minor injuries suffered during a mugging or physical assault. The participants were monitored for the next six months.

Four out of five victims said that since the assault, they were more fearful of other people than they wanted to be, according to the study, which was published March 27 in the journal Psychological Medicine.

Factors that resulted in strong feelings of mistrust lasting for six months included: being attacked close to home, feeling defeated at the time, excessive worry afterward, feeling unsupported by others and sleeping problems.

It is well known that suffering a physical assault can cause symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, but this is the first study to show that excessive mistrust of other people, or paranoia, can last for months after an assault, the researchers said.

"It is very understandable that being attacked makes us wary of the people around us. Our mindset may become more like that of a bodyguard, vigilant for danger," study leader Daniel Freeman, a professor at the University of Oxford, said in a Wellcome Trust news release.

"When we are overly mistrustful, that is a form of paranoia," Freeman said. "It may well be a normal temporary change in our thinking after being a victim of attack."

The danger of such thoughts, however, is that people may end up isolating themselves from others and dwell only on the worst, said Freeman, who led the study while at the Institute of Psychiatry of King's College London.

"It is an under-recognized problem in the aftermath of an attack," he said.

More information

The National Crime Prevention Council outlines ways to protect yourself from violent crime.

Health NewsCopyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Please be aware that this information is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

OF INTEREST:
 

Latest News

Crouse Hospital Receives Quality Achievement Award for Exemplary Stroke Care
more >

MedEx Bedside Prescription Delivery Service

Free service offers convenience, patient education at discharge.
more >

Weight Loss Surgery

Is it right for you? Attend a free information seminar held twice monthly.
more >

Quality at Crouse

See how Crouse Hospital strives to provide the best in patient care.
more >

Cheer Up That Special Someone

Say get well or welcome a new arrival with a gift purchased right at Crouse.

more >

Make an Online Donation Now

Your donation of any amount helps support Crouse services & programs in a meaningful way.
more >

Shop Online Now

Say get well, thinking of you or welcome new baby with a unique gift from the Crouse Gift Shop.

more >