Crouse Health Online: Wellness is just a click away.
Share Share
  |  Connect with Us: 
large
med
small
Text Size
 

Health News



Baby May Help Keep Couples With Fertility Problems Together

Baby May Help Keep Couples With Fertility Problems Together

01/30/14

THURSDAY, Jan. 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Couples who seek evaluation for infertility problems are more likely to stay together if they are ultimately able to have a child, a new Danish study suggests.

Researchers followed couples after they first sought assistance with fertility issues. Women who didn't have a child over the next 12 years were up to three times more likely to get divorced or end the relationship compared to women who gave birth to a child during that follow-up period, the investigators found.

The study included more than 47,500 women in Denmark who were evaluated for infertility between 1990 and 2006. Among this group, 57 percent gave birth after fertility treatment.

The findings are published in the Jan. 29 online edition of the journal Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, a journal of the Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

"Our findings suggest that not having a child after fertility treatment may adversely affect the duration of a relationship for couples with fertility issues," said study lead author Trille Kristina Kjaer, of the survivorship unit at the Danish Cancer Society Research Center in Copenhagen.

"Further investigations that account for marital quality and relational well-being of couples with fertility problems are now needed," Kjaer noted in a journal news release.

Previous research has examined the effects of infertility and suggested that women may be more deeply affected. Failing to have a baby despite efforts can lead to high levels of stress and anxiety for the couple and may negatively affect their quality of life, the study authors noted in the news release.

However, the researchers added, other studies have suggested that a fertility struggle can also bring a couple closer together, creating what is sometimes called a "marital benefit" brought on by sharing a common hardship.

While the study found an association between failed fertility treatment efforts and breakups among couples, it did not prove a cause-and-effect relationship.

More information

For more about infertility, visit the U.S. National Library of Medicine.

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Please be aware that this information is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

OF INTEREST:
 

Latest News

Crouse Hospital Receives Quality Achievement Award for Exemplary Stroke Care
more >

MedEx Bedside Prescription Delivery Service

Free service offers convenience, patient education at discharge.
more >

Weight Loss Surgery

Is it right for you? Attend a free information seminar held twice monthly.
more >

Quality at Crouse

See how Crouse Hospital strives to provide the best in patient care.
more >

Cheer Up That Special Someone

Say get well or welcome a new arrival with a gift purchased right at Crouse.

more >

Make an Online Donation Now

Your donation of any amount helps support Crouse services & programs in a meaningful way.
more >

Shop Online Now

Say get well, thinking of you or welcome new baby with a unique gift from the Crouse Gift Shop.

more >