Crouse Health Online: Wellness is just a click away.
Share Share
  |  Connect with Us: 
large
med
small
Text Size
 

Health News



Caucasian Boys Most Prone to Color Blindness, Study Finds

Caucasian Boys Most Prone to Color Blindness, Study Finds

04/04/14

THURSDAY, April 3, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Caucasian boys are the most likely to be color blind, while the risk is lowest in African-American boys, a new study finds.

The researchers also confirmed that girls are much less likely to be color blind, which is an inability to see colors accurately. The most common form of the condition involves a genetic mutation that makes it hard to distinguish the color red from the color green.

Researchers tested more than 4,000 preschoolers, aged 3 to 6, in California and found that 5.6 percent of Caucasian boys were color blind, compared with 3.1 percent of Asian boys, 2.6 percent of Hispanic boys, and 1.4 percent of African-American boys.

Among girls, rates of color blindness ranged from 0 percent to 0.5 percent among different racial/ethnic groups, according to the study published online April 3 in the journal Ophthalmology.

The researchers also concluded that screening for color blindness can begin at age 4. Testing for the condition at an early age is important because children with color blindness often do poorly on tests or assignments that feature color-coded materials.

"It's not that the child is not smart enough or bright enough, it's that they see the world a little differently," lead investigator Dr. Rohit Varma, chairman of the department of ophthalmology at the University of Southern California (USC) School of Medicine and director of the USC Eye Institute, said in a journal news release.

Children with color blindness require different types of lesson plans that don't require the ability to see colors correctly.

"That needs to start early on because labeling a child as not smart or bright enough is a huge stigma for the child and causes significant anxiety for the parents and family," Varma said.

More information

Prevent Blindness America has more about color blindness.

Copyright © 2014 HealthDay. All rights reserved.

Please be aware that this information is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

OF INTEREST:
 

Latest News

Crouse Hospital Receives National Accreditation for Heart Failure
more >

MedEx Bedside Prescription Delivery Service

Free service offers convenience, patient education at discharge.
more >

Weight Loss Surgery

Is it right for you? Attend a free information seminar held twice monthly.
more >

Quality at Crouse

See how Crouse Hospital strives to provide the best in patient care.
more >

Cheer Up That Special Someone

Say get well or welcome a new arrival with a gift purchased right at Crouse.

more >

Make an Online Donation Now

Your donation of any amount helps support Crouse services & programs in a meaningful way.
more >

Shop Online Now

Say get well, thinking of you or welcome new baby with a unique gift from the Crouse Gift Shop.

more >